Call First for Appointment?

Call or Schedule here.

Electronic Filing Offered?

Yes.

Drop-off Service Available?

Yes, strongly encouraged.

Required documents to keep on file:

  • Copies of Drivers License or State IDs
  • Social Security Cards
  • Proof of Residence for dependents claiming EIC

Income documents:

  • W-2s
  • 1099s
  • Proof of jury duty pay
  • Proof of alimony you received
  • Social Security statement (1099-SSA)
  • Dividend and interest statements (1099-DIV and 1099-INT)
  • Retirement distributions (1099-R)
  • Brokerage statements (1099-B), along with statements showing when you bought and sold your investments.
  • K-1 statements reporting profits from partnerships, trusts, and small businesses
  • Record of income and expenses for your rental property
  • Record of income and expenses for your self-employment

(Use our handy IRS document search tool for your documents)

Other tax documents:

  • HUD-1 Escrow statement for property you bought or sold
  • Summary of moving expenses
  • Summary of educational expenses (college tuition)
  • Summary of your child care, day care, or adult day care expenses
  • IRA contributions (traditional, SEP, or rollovers)
  • Student loan interest paid (1098-E)

Tax deduction documents:

  • Health care expenses (doctors, dentists, health insurance, eye care, medicine)
  • Real estate taxes
  • Motor vehicle registration
  • Mortgage interest paid (1098)
  • Gifts to charity
  • Last year’s tax preparation fees
  • Job-related expenses (union dues, job education, uniforms
  • Loss of property due to casualty or theft
  • Gambling losses

How can I check on my tax refunds?

Tax Related Web-sites/phone numbers:
IRS www.irs.gov
IRS Get Refund Status
IRS Inquiry Phone: (800) 829-1040

CURRENT TAX RATES

Current rates information provided by Tax Foundation

2018 Tax Brackets
Income Tax Brackets and Rates

In 2018, the income limits for all tax brackets and all filers will be adjusted for inflation and will be as follows (Tables 1 and 2). The top marginal income tax rate of 37 percent will hit taxpayers with taxable income of $500,000 and higher for single filers and $600,000 and higher for married couples filing jointly.

RateFor Unmarried Individuals, Taxable Income OverFor Married Individuals Filing Joint Returns, Taxable Income OverFor Heads of Households, Taxable Income Over

Table 1. Tax Brackets and Rates, 2018

10%$0$0$0
12%$9,525$19,050$13,600
22%$38,700$77,400$51,800
24%$82,500$165,000$82,500
32%$157,500$315,000$157,500
35%$200,000$400,000$200,000
37%$500,000$600,000$500,000

Standard Deduction and Personal Exemption

The standard deduction for single filers will increase by $5,500 and by $11,000 for married couples filing jointly (Table 4).

The personal exemption for 2018 is eliminated.

Filing StatusDeduction Amount

Table 2. 2018 Standard Deduction and Personal Exemption

Single$12,000
Married Filing Jointly$24,000
Head of Household$18,000

Alternative Minimum Tax

The Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT) was created in the 1960s to prevent high-income taxpayers from avoiding the individual income tax. This parallel tax income system requires high-income taxpayers to calculate their tax bill twice: once under the ordinary income tax system and again under the AMT. The taxpayer then needs to pay the higher of the two.

The AMT uses an alternative definition of taxable income called Alternative Minimum Taxable Income (AMTI). To prevent low- and middle-income taxpayers from being subject to the AMT, taxpayers are allowed to exempt a significant amount of their income from AMTI. However, this exemption phases out for high-income taxpayers. The AMT is levied at two rates: 26 percent and 28 percent.

The AMT exemption amount for 2018 is $70,300 for singles and $109,400 for married couples filing jointly (Table 7).

Filing StatusExemption Amount

Table 3. 2018 Alternative Minimum Tax
Exemptions

Unmarried Individuals$70,300
Married Filing Jointly$109,400

In 2018, the 28 percent AMT rate applies to excess AMTI of $191,500 for all taxpayers ($95,750 for married couples filing joint returns).

Under the TCJA, AMT exemptions phase out at 25 cents per dollar earned once taxpayer AMTI hits a certain threshold. In 2018, the exemption will start phasing out at $500,000 in AMTI for single filers and $1 million for married taxpayers filing jointly (Table 8.)

Filing StatusThreshold

Table 4. 2018 Alternative Minimum Tax Exemption Phaseout
Thresholds
Unmarried Individuals$500,000
Married Filing Jointly$1,000,000

Earned Income Tax Credit

The maximum Earned Income Tax Credit in 2018 for single and joint filers is $520, if the filer has no children (Table 9). The credit is $3,468 for one child, $5,728 for two children, and $6,444 for three or more children. All of these are relatively small increases from 2017.

Filing StatusNo ChildrenOne ChildTwo ChildrenThree or More Children

Table 5. 2018
Earned
Income Tax
Credit
Parameters
Single or Head of HouseholdIncome at Max Credit$6,800.00$10,200.00$14,320.00$14,320.00
Maximum Credit$520.00$3,468.00$5,728.00$6,444.00
Phaseout Begins$8,510.00$18,700.00$18,700.00$18,700.00
Phaseout Ends (Credit Equals Zero)$15,310.00$40,402.00$45,898.00$49,298.00
Married Filing JointlyIncome at Max Credit$6,800.00$10,200.00$14,320.00$14,320.00
Maximum Credit$520.00$3,468.00$5,728.00$6,444.00
Phaseout Begins$14,200.00$24,400.00$24,400.00$24,400.00
Phaseout Ends (Credit Equals Zero)$21,000.00$46,102.00$51,598.00$54,998.00

2017 Tax Rates
Estimated Income Tax Brackets and Rates

In 2017, the income limits for all tax brackets and all filers will be adjusted for inflation and will be as follows (Table 1). The top marginal income tax rate of 39.6 percent will hit taxpayers with taxable income of $418,400 and higher for single filers and $470,700 and higher for married couples filing jointly.

RateTaxable Income BracketTax Owed

Table 1. Single Taxable Income
Tax Brackets and Rates, 2017
RateTaxable Income Tax Owed
10%$0 to $9,32510% of Taxable Income
15%$9,325 to $37,950$932.50 plus 15% of the excess over $9325
25%$37,950 to $91,900$5,226.25 plus 25% of the excess over $37,950
28%$91,900 to $191,650$18,713.75 plus 28% of the excess over $91,900
33%$191,650 to $416,700$46,643.75 plus 33% of the excess over $191,650
35%$416,700 to $418,400$120,910.25 plus 35% of the excess over $416,700
39.60%$418,400+$121,505.25 plus 39.6% of the excess over $418,400

Table 2. Married Filing Joint
Taxable Income Tax Brackets and Rates,
2017
Rate Taxable Income BracketTax Owed
10%$0 to $18,65010% of taxable income
15%$18,650 to $75,900$1,865 plus 15% of the excess over $18,650
25%$75,900 to $153,100$10,452.50 plus 25% of the excess over $75,900
28%$153,100 to $233,350$29,752.50 plus 28% of the excess over $153,100
33%$233,350 to $416,700$52,222.50 plus 33% of the excess over $233,350
35%$416,700 to $470,700$112,728 plus 35% of the excess over $416,700
39.60%$470,700+$131,628 plus 39.6% of the excess over $470,700

Table 3. Head of Household
Taxable Income
Tax Brackets and Rates, 2017
Source: IRS.
10%$0 to $13,35010% of taxable income
15%$13,350 to $50,800$1,335 plus 15% of the excess over $13,350
25%$50,800 to $131,200$6,952.50 plus 25% of the excess over $50,800
28%$131,200 to $212,500$27,052.50 plus 28% of the excess over $131,200
33%$212,500 to $416,700$49,816.50 plus 33% of the excess over $212,500
35%$416,700 to $444,500$117,202.50 plus 35% of the excess over $416,701
39.60%$444,550+$126,950 plus 39.6% of the excess over $444,550

Standard Deduction and Personal Exemption

The standard deduction for single filers will increase by $50 and $100 for married couples filing jointly (Table 4). The personal exemption for 2017 remains the same at $4,050.

Filing Status Deduction Amount

Table 4. 2017 Standard Deduction and Personal
Exemption
Single$6,350
Married Filing Jointly$12,700
Head of Household$9,350
Personal Exemption$4,050
Source: IRS.

PEP and Pease

PEP and Pease are two provisions in the tax code that increase taxable income for high-income earners. PEP is the phaseout of the personal exemption and Pease (named after former Senator Donald Pease) phases out the value of most itemized deductions once a taxpayer’s adjusted gross income reaches a certain amount. The income threshold for both PEP and Pease will increase from last year to $261,500 for single filers and $318,800 for married couples filing jointly (Tables 5 and 6). PEP will end at $384,000 for singles and $436,300 for married couples filing jointly (both will increase from 2016), meaning that taxpayers with AGI above these limits will no longer benefit from personal exemptions.

Filing StatusIncome

Table 5. 2017 Pease Limitations on Itemized Deductions
Single$261,500
Married Filing Jointly$313,800
Head of Household$287,650
Married Filing Separately$156,900
Source: IRS.

Table 6. 2017 Personal Exemption
Phaseout
Single$261,500$384,000
Married Filing Jointly$313,800$436,300
Head of Household$287,650$410,150
Married Filing Separately$156,900$218,150
Source: IRS.

Alternative Minimum Tax

The Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT) was created in the 1960s to prevent high-income taxpayers from avoiding the individual income tax. This parallel tax income system requires high-income taxpayers to calculate their tax bill twice: once under the ordinary income tax system and again under the AMT. The taxpayer then needs to pay the higher of the two. The AMT uses an alternative definition of taxable income called Alternative Minimum Taxable Income (AMTI). To prevent low- and middle-income taxpayers from being subject to the AMT, taxpayers are allowed to exempt a significant amount of their income from AMTI. However, this exemption phases out for high-income taxpayers. The AMT is levied at two rates: 26 percent and 28 percent. The AMT exemption amount for 2017 is $54,300 for singles and $84,500 for married couples filing jointly (Table 7).

Filing StatusExemption Amount

Table 7. 2017 Alternative Minimum Tax
Exemptions
Single$54,300
Married Filing Jointly$84,500
Married Filing Separately$42,250
Trusts & Estates$24,100
Source: IRS.

In 2017, the 28 percent AMT rate applies to excess AMTI of $187,800 for all taxpayers ($93,900 for married couples filing joint returns). Under current law, AMT exemptions phase out at 25 cents per dollar earned once taxpayer AMTI hits a certain threshold. In 2017, the exemption will start phasing out at $120,700 in AMTI for single filers and $160,900 for married taxpayers filing jointly (Table 8).
Filing StatusThreshold

Table 8. 2017 Alternative Minimum Tax Exemption Phaseout
Thresholds
Single$120,700
Married Filing Jointly$160,900
Married Filing Separately, Estates and Trusts$80,450

Earned Income Tax Credit

2017’s maximum Earned Income Tax Credit for singles, heads of households, and joint filers is $510, if the filer has no children (Table 9). The credit is $3,400 for one child, $5,616 for two children, and $6,318 for three or more children. All of the aforementioned are relatively small increases from 2016.

Filing Status No ChildrenOne ChildTwo ChildrenThree or More Children

Table 9. 2017
Earned
Income Tax
Credit
Parameters
Source: IRS.
Single or Head of HouseholdIncome at Max Credit$6,670$10,000$14,040$14,040
Maximum Credit$510$3,400$5,616$6,318
Phaseout Begins$8,340
$18,340
$18,340$18,340
Phaseout Ends (Credit Equals Zero)$15,010$39,617$45,007$48,340
Married Filing JointlyIncome at Max Credit$6,670
$10,000
$14,040$14,040
Maximum Credit$510$3,400
$5,616
$6,318
Phaseout Begins$13,930$23,930$23,930$23,930
Phaseout Ends (Credit Equals Zero)$20,600$45,207$50,597$53,930